Harlem Neighborhood Guide: Culture, History, Brownstones & More

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New York City

Guide

Harlem Neighborhood Guide

Visit Harlem for Brownstones, Culture, History & More

By Pamela Skillings

Updated 05/15/17

•••

Harlem Overview

Historic Harlem is experiencing a second renaissance, fueled by Manhattan‘s booming real estate market (and thanks to the gorgeous Harlem brownstones within the neighborhood). Harlem has been through good times and bad, but the future certainly looks bright. Crime is down and real estate prices are up (but still much cheaper than elsewhere in Manhattan). Great restaurants and bars – both old and new – draw fans from all over New York.

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Harlem Boundaries

Greater Harlem can be broken into two distinct quarters:

  • East Harlem/El Barrio (Spanish Harlem): From the East River to 5th Avenue and from East 96th Street to the Harlem River
  • Central Harlem: 110th Street (just north of Central Park) to the Harlem River and from 5th Avenue to St. Nicholas Avenue.

Harlem Subway Transportation

  • East Harlem: 96th Street (6); 103rd Street (6); 110th Street (4, 5, 6); 116th Street (6); 125th Street (4, 5, 6)
  • Central Harlem:  Central Park North/110th Street (2, 3); 116th Street (2, 3); 125th Street (2, 3); 135th Street (2, 3); 145th Street (3); 148th Street (3); Cathedral Parkway/110th Street (B, C); 116th Street (B, C); 125th Street (A, B, C, D); 135th Street (B, C); 145th Street (A, B, C, D); 155th Street (B, D); 155th Street (C)

Harlem Real Estate: Harlem Brownstones & Apartments

Harlem is one of the last places to find decent real estate deals in Manhattan.

Although rents and condo prices are rising, they’re still inexpensive compared to other Manhattan neighborhoods. You can still find Harlem brownstones that cost much less than similar properties just a mile to the south. Meanwhile, developers are building co-ops and condos to meet demand from New Yorkers who can’t afford to buy a townhouse or a brownstone.

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Harlem Average Rents (*Source: MNS)

  • Studio/1BR: $1,753–$3,020
  • 2BR: $2,588–$3,827

Harlem Real Estate Prices(*Source: Trulia)

  • $875K: Median home sale in 2015

Harlem Essential Information & Cultural Institutions

Harlem Restaurants & Nightlife

  • Rao’s: The famous (and notorious) Rao’s serves old-school Italian to New York notables and self-proclaimed gangsters. 455 E. 114th St. at Pleasant Ave., 212/722-6709
  • Sylvia’s: Sylvia’s soul food draws crowds of tourists and locals to Harlem. 328 Malcolm X Blvd. at W. 126th St., 212/996-0660

Harlem History

In the neighborhood’s golden age in the 1920s and ’30s, Harlem was the heart of black culture in the United States. Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald performed at hot Harlem clubs like the Cotton Club and the Apollo. Writers Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes became Harlem literary legends.But hard economic times hit Harlem during the Depression and continued through the 1980s. With rampant poverty, high unemployment, and high crime rates, Harlem was a tough place to live.Redevelopment in the 1980s revived interest in the neighborhood.

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As the Manhattan real estate market boomed, the abandoned buildings in Harlem were replaced with new housing and office buildings. Real estate investors snatched up beautiful old Harlem brownstones that had fallen into disrepair and began restoring them to their former glory. Soon Bill Clinton and Starbucks moved in, and Harlem’s second renaissance became official.

Harlem Neighborhood Statistics

  • Total Population: 230,338
  • Median Age: 37 for females, 32 for males
  • Median Household Income: $36,395

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The Ultimate Neighborhood Guide to Manhattan’s Tribeca

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New York City

Guide

Learn All About the Tribeca Neighborhood in Manhattan

The Naming of Tribeca, Its History and Top Spots

By Pamela Skillings

Updated 11/25/17

•••

Manhattan’s Tribeca, home to the Tribeca Film Festival and approximately 17,000 residents, is a neighborhood of cobblestone streets, world-famous restaurants, and historic warehouse buildings that have been converted to multimillion-dollar lofts. Easily one of the city’s most expensive areas, the 10013 zip code features one of Manhattan‘s most charming neighborhoods.

Where Exactly Is Tribeca?

Tribeca borders SoHo and the Financial District.

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It stretches from Canal Street south to Vesey Street and from Broadway west to the Hudson River. Cross the West Side Highway at Chambers Street to enjoy the lovely Hudson River Park and River Promenade, which stretches from Battery Park City to Chelsea Piers and beyond.

History

The name “TriBeCa,” a syllabic abbreviation for “Triangle Below Canal” Street, was coined by city planners in the 1960s. Originally farmland, Tribeca was commercialized in the 1850s with warehouses and factories for produce, textiles, and dry goods. Now, lofts and restaurants have moved into the former industrial, cast-iron buildings.

Transportation

Buses, taxis, and cars can get you to and from Tribeca, but, perhaps the easiest mode of transportation around Manhattan holds true for Tribeca, too—the subway.

The 1 train stops at Canal, Franklin, or Chambers. The 2 and 3 express lines stop only at Chambers. A, C, and E trains stop at Canal near West Broadway.

Apartments and Real Estate

Known for its lofts and celebrity residents like Robert De Niro and Beyonce, Tribeca is one of Manhattan’s hottest and priciest neighborhoods. Developers have converted most of the old warehouse buildings into luxury condos and rentals. The average age of a resident in the neighborhood is 37 and the average annual income is $180,000.

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Rents range from $3,000 to $5,000 a month for a studio or one-bedroom apartment. For about $6,500 to $8,000 you might be able to find yourself a two-bedroom apartment. Average real estate prices for a home in Tribeca was $3.5 million in 2017.

Restaurants and Nightlife

At Robert De Niro’s Tribeca Grill, you may get celebrities sightings and can expect good Mediterranean cuisine. Nobu, co-owned by Japanese celebrity chef Nobuyuki “Nobu” Matsuhisa and De Niro, is one of Manhattan’s top sushi spots—and its signature cod in miso sauce should not be missed.

On the bar scene, Paul’s Cocktail Lounge and The Django jazz club, at the Roxy Hotel (formerly the Tribeca Grand) are a good bet for people-watching.

Tribeca Film Festival

Co-founded by Robert De Niro, the Tribeca Film Festival was created in 2002 in response to the September 11 World Trade Center terrorist attack to reinvigorate the neighborhood and downtown after the physical and financial destruction caused by the attack.

The annual festival in April celebrates New York City as a major filmmaking center. Tribeca is a popular filming location for movies and television shows.

Parks and Recreation

Washington Market Park features a great playground for children and basketball and tennis nearby for the grown-ups.

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The Trapeze School of New York, located on West Street in the Hudson River Park, teaches you to fly through the air with the greatest of ease. You can also find miniature golf, bike paths, and plenty of green grass in the Hudson River Park.

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Our Ultimate NYC Neighborhood Guide to SoHo

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Guide

SoHo Neighborhood Guide

Our Ultimate Guide to SoHo

By Lauren M. Krauze

Updated 05/17/17

•••

SoHo’s picturesque cobblestone streets, cast-iron buildings, and designer boutiques draw quite a crowd. Literally. The narrow streets are so packed that most city folk (and even SoHo residents themselves) tend to avoid the area, especially on weekends and around the holidays. But don’t swear off SoHo – visitors who check out the Manhattan district’s many quality stores, restaurants, and sidewalk vendors during off-peak hours are rarely disappointed.

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SoHo Boundaries

SoHo stretches from Canal Street to Houston Street and lies between the Hudson River and Lafayette Street.

SoHo Transportation

  • Subway: A/C/E to Canal St. or C/E to Spring St.; 1/2/3 to Houston and Canal sts.; R to Prince St.; N/R/Q to Canal St.; 6 to Canal and Spring sts.; J/Z to Canal Street.

SoHo Apartments & Real Estate

While many of central SoHo’s expansive loft spaces are now reserved for the millionaires who can afford to live high above the shopping crowds, the pre-war brick walk-ups in western SoHo have seen renovations and an influx of upper-middle-class residents. Head further west towards the Hudson and find new condos and luxury apartment buildings with hefty price tags.

SoHo Average Rents (*Source: MNS)

  • Studio/1-Bedroom: $2,630–$6,249
  • 2-Bedroom: $4,828–$8,837

SoHo Nightlife

Roll with the high-brow, martini-sipping crowd at Grand Bar & Lounge at the SoHo Grand Hotel. For a more laid-back scene, Kenn’s Broome Street Bar is a neighborhood favorite, along with SoHo Park, an outdoor restaurant/garden perfect for downing a few beers with old friends.

If dancing is your thing, bring your friends to S.O.B.’s and break it down to live Brazilian, reggae, R&B and, hip-hop tunes.

SoHo Restaurants

SoHo is home to celebrity hot-spots like The Mercer Kitchen. Those looking for an equally delicious experience sans paparazzi should head to Balthazar for exceptional French cuisine, The Cub Room for superior American fare, and Dos Caminos SoHo for a sampling of contemporary Mexican dishes.

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If all you’re looking for is a good cup of java and a slice of pie, selections from Once Upon a Tart and Ceci-Cela should curb your sweet tooth.

SoHo Parks & Recreation

Check out the SoHo piers along the Hudson or lounge on the grass of the Hudson River Park. Mosey along the river or hop on your bike or roller-blades and head south for great views of the downtown Manhattan skyline.

SoHo Landmarks & History

SoHo is known for its mid-19th Century cast-iron architecture and to this day, it is the largest surviving cast-iron district in the world. Many commercial buildings along Broadway and Spring Street feature this type of construction, which is an elaborately molded cast-iron exterior bolted to brick walls. The Haughwout Building at 488 Broadway and the Gunther Building at 469 Broome Street display classic examples of cast-iron façades.SoHo is also famous for its loft-style apartments. In the 1970s, many of SoHo’s abandoned commercial and manufacturing buildings offered the perfect spaces for artists seeking large, well-lit interiors for their studios. As artists moved in, the district became populated with galleries and eventually, SoHo became the center of the lower Manhattan art scene.

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By the 1980s, the neighborhood rose in socioeconomic status and became the new trendy Manhattan neighborhood.

SoHo Shopping Scene

Shoppers in SoHo find a wide variety of stores, shops, boutiques and sidewalk vendors selling artwork, apparel, and jewelry. Look out for designer stores such as Dolce & Gabbana, Prada, Marc Jacobs, Coach, Burberry, and Kate Spade.Larger chains such as H&M, J. Crew, Banana Republic, American Eagle Outfitters, and UNIQLO lure shoppers up and down Broadway. Stop by Bloomingdale’s for a large selection of quality merchandise and wander over to Prince Street to check out the Apple Store’s famously hip interior and sleek layout.

SoHo Neighborhood Statistics

  • Population: 14,008
  • Median Age: 39.1 for males, 37.5 for females
  • Median Household Income: $115,190

<em style="box-sizing:border-box;"–< Edited by Elissa Garay

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How to Explore Manhattan’s East Side in One Day

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New York City

Guide

One Day on Manhattan’s East Side

By Heather Cross

Updated 07/21/17

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    The Met, Fifth Avenue and Grand Central Itinerary

    •••

    Looking for a day filled with some of New York City’s best art, shopping, and architecture? I’ve put together a great plan for one day in New York City that will take you to the city’s most well-known art museum, its most famous shopping street, and a beautiful train terminal.

    Start your day with a virtual visit to Vienna in the Neue Gallery’s Cafe Sabarsky (1048 Fifth Avenue (86th Street), 212-288-0665, www.neuegalerie.org/cafes/sabarsky) where you can enjoy expertly made coffee, pastries and more substantial fare to fuel your day of sightseeing. To get there, take the 4, 5, or 6 trains to 86th Street and walk west along 86th Street toward Fifth Avenue. The cafe is located inside the museum and opens at 9 am (closed Tuesdays), giving you plenty of time to enjoy breakfast before heading off for your day of shopping and art.


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    Metropolitan Museum of Art

    •••

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art opens at 10 am daily. Ideally, you should plan to arrive at or shortly after opening in order to avoid crowds and give yourself plenty of time to explore. To get there after finishing your breakfast, walk down Fifth Avenue to the museum’s entrance which is located on Fifth Avenue and 82nd Street.

    Like the American Museum of Natural History, there is no way to see everything at the Met in a single visit. Guided highlights tours (included in the cost of admission) leave from the museum’s Great Hall throughout the day and are an easy way to see a selection of works from the museum’s collection. Alternatively, the museum has put together some suggested itineraries to help you take a self-guided tour and the audio guide is also a wonderful tool for exploring the museum. The museum is also host to ever-changing exhibitions that are included with your admission fee.


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    Lunch and Fifth Avenue

    •••

    If you’re immersed in The Met and aren’t ready to leave, take a break for lunch at one of the museum’s cafes. The Petrie Court Cafe is a particularly nice choice serving a la carte lunch and afternoon tea daily, as well as dinner on Friday and Saturday with Central Park as a backdrop.

    If you’ve exhausted your art-attention-span, head down Fifth Avenue (it’s a little over a mile — you can walk, take the bus (M1, M2, M3 and M4) or catch a cab, as your energy and budget allow) to 59th street and have lunch at the Plaza Food Hall. Located beneath the iconic Plaza Hotel, there are outposts of several delicious NYC restaurants, in a fancy food-court style setting. From sandwiches and lobster rolls to sushi and grilled meats, the variety of vendors (The Todd English Food Hall, Sushi of Gari, Luke’s Lobster and William Greenberg) virtually guarantees everyone in your party will find something to eat, and you can eat together, even if you chose to buy from differentMORE


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    Grand Central Terminal

    •••

    Once you reach 42nd Street, it’s time to leave 5th Avenue and walk east toward Grand Central Terminal. Grand Central is located about two blocks east of 5th Avenue at 89 East 42nd Street.

    This beautiful Beaux Arts building is not only a transportation hub, but it’s home to shops, restaurants, and even a fantastic bar. There are many things to see and do, but first, you must see the iconic clock at the information booth (pictured above). Stand there for a few minutes, taking in the hustle and bustle. Don’t forget to look up at the beautiful ceiling, which illustrates the constellations. Next, head toward the Grand Central Oyster Bar. Outside, give the Whisper Gallery a try — stand in opposite corners with your traveling companion and whisper a message.

    After you’re done playing in the Whisper Gallery, have dinner at the Grand Central Oyster Bar — whether you like your oysters on the half shell or in a pan roast, this only-in-NYC spot can’t be beat. If you’re moreMORE


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    One Day on Manhattan’s East Side Itinerary Summary

    Total Walking Distance: 2.5 miles – This assumes walking the entire route, but doesn’t include time spent walking in the museum. You can cut trim over a mile off your walking distance by taking a cab from the Met to the Plaza Hotel.Best/Worst Days: On Tuesdays, Cafe Sabarsky is closed

    Highlights:Breakfast: Cafe Sabarsky (1048 Fifth Avenue (86th Street), 4/5/6 to 86th Street)Morning: Metropolitan Museum of Art (5th Avenue/82nd Street) 2-4 hoursLunch: Cafe at The Met or Plaza Food Hall (One West 59th Street, Concourse Level)Afternoon: Fifth Avenue to Grand Central Terminal (89 East 42nd Street)Dinner: Grand Central Oyster Bar or Michael Jordan’s The Steak House NYC (both inside of Grand Central)Evening: Campbell Apartment (inside of Grand Central)

48 Hours in Lower Manhattan: The Perfect Itinerary

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New York City

Guide

48 Hours in Lower Manhattan: The Perfect Itinerary

By Elissa Garay

Updated 05/17/17

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  • 01
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    Intro to Lower Manhattan

    •••

    Skyscraper-speckled Lower Manhattan, where the city of New York was born, is in the midst of a rebirth of mammoth proportions some 400 years later. One of the fastest-growing neighborhoods in Manhattan, the historic area falls smack dab between the Hudson and East Rivers, south of Chambers Street, on the island’s southern tip, encompassing the Financial District, Battery Park City, and parts of the Civic Center.

    Here, a maze of haphazard streets (some still cobblestoned) come steeped in centuries of history, where the original Dutch “New Amsterdam” settlement was established in 1626, turning into Britain’s “New York” colony in 1664, before evolving into a bustling modern mega-center for business, finance, and government – layers of development that have produced the intriguing contrast of old and new that is represented here today.

    After the emotional and economic devastation to the quarter in the wake of the September 11th attacks, a large investment in money,MORE


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    Lower Manhattan: Day One

    •••

    2 PM: Check in to your hotel. For a splurge, consider a stay at the fall 2016-debuted Four Seasons Hotel New York Downtown (27 Barclay St.), tucked within a building designed by architect Robert A.M. Stern, and set a stone’s throw from One World Trade Center. The posh hotel brand’s second NYC outpost, 189 chic rooms come outfitted with marble bathrooms, deep-soaking tubs, and lots of high-tech trimmings. There’s also an on-site spa, fitness center, and CUT by Wolfgang Puck – the celebrity chef’s first Manhattan eatery.  

    For more affordable digs, look to the nearby LEED Gold-certified World Center Hotel (144 Washington St.), with 169 comfortable guestrooms featuring floor-to-ceiling windows, iPod docking stations, and value-add amenities like complimentary Wi-Fi and a guest fitness center.

    3 PM: Pay tribute to the 9/11 tragedy and see how the World Trade Center site has risen from its ashes in true phoenix fashion. Start with the evocative and serene 9/11 Memorial(180MORE


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    Lower Manhattan: Day Two

    •••

    9 AM: Rise and shine with a walk over to the modern office, shopping, and dining complex at Brookfield Place (formerly the World Financial Center), fronting the Hudson River just west of One World Trade Center. Home to a slate of high-end retailers, the likes of Burberry, Gucci, and Saks Fifth Avenue have set up shop here (230 Vesey St.). There are numerous worthwhile eateries worth seeking out (like the Blue Ribbon Sushi Bar), but for breakfast, check out Le District, a French-inspired food hall serving crepes, pastries, coffee, and more, or Hudson Eats, a fancy food court with breakfast-friendly options like Black Seed Bagel.

    10 AM: Continue with a stroll along the waterfront on the Battery Park City Esplanade, boasting great views of the Hudson River and out onto New York Harbor (and the Statue of Liberty), while skirting the entire length of the residential, family-friendly community of Battery Park City.

    10:30 AM: The area’s most famous attraction is accessed from Battery Park,MORE


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    Lower Manhattan: Day Three

    •••

    9:30 AM: It’s worth a wander a bit north of the hotel to Zucker’s Bagels (146 Chambers St.) for hand-rolled, kettle-boiled, NYC-style bagels, served with specialty coffees.

    10 AM: Mosey over to the pretty and historic City Hall Park (site of City Hall) and its environs where you can take in a few more notable historic landmarks. Don’t miss St. Paul’s Chapel (209 Broadway), dating to 1766, where George Washington worshiped after his inauguration; it somewhat miraculously survived the 9/11 attacks, despite its close proximity to Ground Zero. Nearby, take a gander at the 60-story, neo-Gothic Woolworth Building (233 Broadway) – aka the “cathedral of commerce” – which was the tallest building in the world when it debuted in 1913.

    11 AM: Across from City Hall Park is the pedestrian access point for the Brooklyn Bridge, which marks one of NYC’s most iconic strolls. The architecturally stunning, neo-Gothic Brooklyn Bridge – dating to 1883 – is considered still todayMORE

A Guide to Making the Most of Your Visit to Manhattan’s MoMA

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New York City

Guide

A Guide to NYC’S Museum of Modern Art (MoMA): Hours, Location & More

Take in Incredible Modern and Contemporary Art at Manhattan’s MoMA

By Lauren M. Krauze

Updated 05/17/17

•••

Manhattan’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), in Midtown, houses one of the world’s most prestigious modern and contemporary art collections, with an extensive collection of modern paintings, sculptures, and installations. With elegantly displayed works by artists such as Picasso, Van Gogh, and Warhol, and an active schedule of exhibitions, films, and educational programs, the MoMA continues to attract modern art enthusiasts as well as curious visitors seeking an edgy cultural experience.

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Here’s everything you need to know about making the most of your visit to Manhattan’s MoMA, including hours, location, and more:

A Floor-by-Floor Guide to MoMA’s Top Attractions

The main building is a six-floor complex spilling over with special exhibitions and pieces from the permanent collection. Each floor is separated into galleries and hallways, with wide entrances that allow the rooms to flow into each other. Stairs, elevators, and escalators facilitate movement from level to level.

If you’re a first-time visitor to MoMA in Manhattan, starting from the top floor and working your way down is probably your best option. The 4th and 5th floors contain some of the museum’s most famous works.

  • 6th floor: This expansive space is reserved for special and/or temporary exhibitions.
  • 5th floor: The 5th floor is divided into 14 galleries displaying paintings and sculptures by world-renowned artists, with works from the 1880s through 1940s. Grab a bite to eat at Terrace 5, a full-service café serving  snacks, desserts, and wine. On this floor, you can see:
    • The Starry Night, by Vincent Van Gogh
    • Water Lilies, by Claude Monet
    • The Persistence of Memory, by Salvador Dalí
    • Dance (I), by Henri Matisse
  • 4th Floor: Explore the galleries of the 4th floor and see more paintings, sculptures, and installations by famous modern artists with works from the 1940s through 1980. On this floor, you can see:
    • Campbell’s Soup Cans, by Andy Warhol
    • One, by Jackson Pollock
    • Map, by Jasper Johns
  • 3rd Floor: The 3rd floor holds a vast assortment of drawings, photographs, and architecture and design pieces. Also check out the floor’s special exhibitions, which explore current architecture projects and larger collections from the drawing and photography galleries.

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  • 2nd Floor: The 2nd floor is home to the museum’s media and contemporary (from 1980 on) art galleries, which feature large-scale pieces and installations. Also check out the print and illustrated books section and Café 2, a cafeteria-style eatery with pasta, chicken, and dessert dishes.
  • 1st Floor/Lobby: With ticket counters, information centers, membership services, and audio equipment rentals, the 1st floor serves as the museum’s information hub. In nice weather, take a stroll through the outdoor Sculpture Garden, also located on this level. Afterwards, stop by The Modern, the MoMA’s sophisticated fine dining restaurant. A separate bar room, which serves smaller plates of The Modern’s French-American cuisine, complements the main room, which overlooks the Sculpture Garden. Enter on 53rd Street and enjoy the restaurant beyond museum hours.

MoMA Exhibitions

MoMA hosts a wide variety of seasonal exhibitions (check out the current exhibitions at MoMA).

MoMA Location and Contact Information

MoMA is located at 11 West 53rd Street, between 5th and 6th Avenues.

Contact MoMA at 212-708-9400, or visit their website at www.moma.org.

Subway Directions to MoMA

  • E/M to 5th Ave.–/53rd St.; B/D/F to 47th–50th Sts./Rockefeller Center

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MoMA Hours

  • Sat.–Thu. 10:30am–5:30pm; Fri. 10:30am–8pm

MoMA Admission

  • Adults: $25
  • Seniors (65 and over with ID): $18
  • Students (full-time with current ID): $14
  • Children (16 and under): Free
  • Members: Free

To save a few bucks, visit MoMA on Friday evenings between 4pm and 8pm when admission is free. What’s the occasion? UNIQLO Free Friday Nights, sponsored by the clothing store. Come after 6pm to avoid the longest lines.

<em style="box-sizing:border-box;"–< Updated by Elissa Garay

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Our Ultimate NYC Neighborhood Guide to Chelsea

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New York City

Guide

Chelsea Neighborhood Guide

Our Ultimate Guide to Chelsea

By Pamela Skillings

Updated 05/17/17

•••

Manhattan’s Chelsea has it all – nightlife, art, shopping, and recreation at the piers. And, of course, a happening gay scene. It’s no wonder that those enormous luxury rental buildings have sprung up all over the neighborhood.

Chelsea Boundaries

Chelsea stretches from 15th Street to 34th Street (give or take), between the Hudson River and Sixth Avenue.

Chelsea Transportation

  • Subway: A, C, and E to 14th, 23rd, or 34th sts.; F to 23rd; 1, 2, or 3 to 14th or 34th sts.; 1 to 18th, 23rd, or 28th sts.; L to 14th St.; 7 to 34th St.–Hudson Yards

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Chelsea Apartments & Real Estate

Chelsea offers a mix of townhouses, pre-war co-ops, and luxury doorman buildings. You’ll find less expensive deals north of 23rd St. and into the 30’s.

Chelsea Average Rents (*Source: MNS)

  • Studio/1-Bedroom: $2,630 –$4,588
  • 2-Bedroom: $4,389–$7,272

Chelsea Nightlife

The Chelsea club scene is hot. Current favorites include Amnesia, High Line Ballroom, Marquee, and Oak. If you tire of the club scene, check out comedy shows at the Upright Citizens Brigade.

Chelsea Restaurants

Francisco’s is THE place to go for great lobster at reasonable prices (and addictive sangria) – this is a crowded, noisy spot that’s great for groups. For a more trendy scene, stop by Elmo for chic comfort food and cocktails.

Chelsea Parks & Recreation

The Chelsea Piers has something for everyone – golf, bowling, skating, batting cages, and rock climbing. Kids’ programs include soccer, gymnastics, baseball, and more.

You’ll also find a fitness center and a deluxe spa. Take your bike or rollerblades down to the Hudson River Esplanade for more green grass and river views.

Chelsea Landmarks & History

Chelsea’s origins date back to 1750 and the neighborhood has seen a lot of change since its days as a family farm. Chelsea was the city’s first theater district, a fashionable shopping destination, and a thriving vice district in the 1920s and 1930s.

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Explore Chelsea’s past by visiting landmarks such as the Chelsea Historic District (20th to 22nd St. between 8th and 10th Ave.), where you’ll see architecture from the 1800’s. Don’t miss the Chelsea Hotel, bohemian landmark and former home of writers and artists such as William S. Burroughs and Bob Dylan – though now probably better known as the place where Sid killed Nancy.

Chelsea Art Scene

Chelsea is the art capital of New York with more than 200 galleries. They dot the West Chelsea streets between 20th and 28th. Some of the most famous include the Gagosian Gallery on West 24th and the Matthew Marks Gallery on West 22nd.

Chelsea Neighborhood Statistics

  • Total Population: 40,456
  • Median Age: 40.9 for males, 38.4 for females
  • Median Household Income: $114,486

<em style="box-sizing:border-box;"–< Edited by Elissa Garay

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A Neighborhood Guide to Coney Island in Brooklyn, NY

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New York City

Guide

Coney Island Neighborhood Profile

By Kristen Goode

Updated 07/27/17

•••

There may be no neighborhood in Brooklyn more legendary than Coney Island. With its historic amusement park and boardwalk, the annual Mermaid Parade, and, of course, its original “Nathan’s Famous” hot dogs, Coney Island may not be the seaside resort it was during the 1800s, but its character still remains. Wacky and wild, this well-known Brooklyn enclave is worth visiting.

Coney Island on the Map

Coney Island is located in south Brooklyn and is bordered on the south by the Atlantic Ocean, on the north by the Belt Parkway, on the east by the Ocean Parkway, and on the west by the gated community known as “Sea Gate.” You can easily get there via public transportation (aka the ​MTA subway system).

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The Coney Island-Stillwell Avenue station is the last stop on the Q, D, F, and N subway lines.

Coney Island Real Estate

Located about an hour away from Manhattan on the subway, Coney Island offers homes to those who don’t mind a commute. Prices rival those throughout Brooklyn with apartments starting at approximately $350,000 and studios renting for $1000 to $1500.

Coney Island Bars & Restaurants

No trip to Coney Island is complete without sampling a hot dog from the original “Nathan’s Famous,” which opened in 1916 and, every year on the Fourth of July, hosts a now-famous hot dog eating competition. Visitors and locals alike flock to “Totonno’s” for delicious thin-crust pizza. Or, head east from the boardwalk to the area known as “Little Odessa” for authentic Russian food.

Coney Island Activities & Attractions

Coney Island offers something for everyone. Visit the 14-acre New York Aquarium; watch a baseball game at Keyspan Park; ride the historic Wonder Wheel (built in 1920) and Cyclone roller coaster (built in 1927) in Astroland, New York City’s largest amusement park; or just spend a day relaxing on the beach and enjoying the neighborhood’s boardwalk, which stretches for three miles.

For more insider information straight from the locals, visit the Coney Island neighborhood blog, Kinetic Carnival.

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A Helpful Map for Visiting NYC’s SoHo and TriBeCa Areas

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New York City

Guide

SoHo / TriBeCa Neighborhood Map

By Heather Cross

Updated 05/15/17

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TriBeCa is probably best known for the annual Tribeca Film Festival, but its cobblestone streets, smart boutiques and cute restaurants make it a fun destination year-round. SoHo is particularly popular for shoppers ​who enjoy the great stores lining Broadway and side streets, but there are also great restaurants and fun people watching in the area.

More: TriBeCa Neighborhood Guide

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What to See, Eat, and Do in NYC’s Chinatown Neighborhood

United States


New York


New York City

Guide

Chinatown Neighborhood Guide

The Largest Chinese Settlement in the United States

By Heather Cross

Updated 11/20/17

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If you’re planning on visiting New York City this year, chances are you’ll want to check out the bustling area of lower Manhattan known as Chinatown, a cultural cross-section of New York City and Chinese immigrant lifestyles that features a ton of great restaurants, cheap shops, and fine goods stores.

Since the late 1870s, Chinese immigrants have been settling in the New York City area, and despite the Exclusion Act of 1882, which prohibited Chinese immigration, the community and geography of Manhattan’s Chinatown have grown steadily throughout the city’s history.

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Since 1965, when the immigration quotas were repealed, the immigrant community of Chinatown has grown and the census of 1980 indicated that New York Chinatown is the largest Chinese American settlement in the United States.

The streets of Chinatown are great for wandering—there are fabulous stores for buying Asian groceries and goods (which make great souvenirs) and even the sometimes stinky seafood markets are worth a look. When you get hungry, there are many options for delicious, affordable food representing a wide variety of Chinese cuisines, including restaurants specializing in Dim Sum, Cantonese cuisine, congee, and seafood.

There is a very helpful Explore Chinatown Info Kiosk located on Canal at Walker & Baxter that’s open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and until 7 p.m. on weekends with bilingual staff available to answer your questions and provide free Chinatown maps, guides, and brochures.

Getting to Chinatown: Subways, Bus, or Walking

Chinatown in Manhattan extends east to west from Essex Street to Broadway Avenue and north to south from Grand Street to Henry Street and East Broadway, meaning there are a number of public transit options for accessing this Chinese-heavy settlement.

In terms of MTA trains, you can hop the 6, N, R, Q, or W trains to the Canal Street Station, the B or D trains to Grand Street Station, or the J, M, or Z trains to Canal & Centre Street or Chambers Street Stations and walk right out in the center of Chinatown’s bustling streets.

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Alternatively, you can take the M15 bus down 2nd Avenue to Chatham Square, the M102 and M101 south on Lexington Avenue to Bowery Street and Chatham Square, or the M6 bus that runs south on Broadway to Canal Street.

Driving or grabbing a cab or Uber/Lyft service is also an option, but keep in mind that cab fare can quickly add up when traveling to this busy section of Manhattan, so don’t be surprised if you get stuck in slow-moving traffic—it might even be faster to walk at some points in time in the day, so don’t fret if you have to tell the driver you’d rather be let out early and walk if you get stuck in slow-moving traffic.

Architecture, Tours, Restaurants, and Shops

Just south of Little Italy, the Chinatown area of Manhattan is full of amazing attractions, shops, restaurants, and even a few specialty tours to familiarize tourists with this unique neighborhood. Many buildings in Chinatown have Asian-inspired facades featuring pagodas and tiled roofs or are narrow tenement houses that create a bustling, slightly congested environment, and the Church of the Transfiguration and the Mahayana Buddhist Temple are among Chinatown’s architectural gems.

A number of tours will help guide you through this neighborhood including  “Explore Chinatown with Foods of New York,” “Discover Chinatown with Enthusiastic Gourmet,” “Immigrant New York with Big Onion Tours,” and walking tours with the Museum of Chinese in the Americas, many of which will take guests to some of the area’s best restaurants and places to get ​Dim Sum, a Chinese staple.

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Other attractions in the area include Chatham Square, Columbus Park, Five Points, ​the Museum of the Chinese in the Americas, the First Shearith Israel Cemetery, and the Edward Mooney House, and you can find great food shopping at ​Kam Man Food Products,​ Chinatown Fish Markets, or one of the many other stores available on the ​Chinatown Shopping Directory.

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